ATÁPAKUA DE AYOCOTES 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE BEANS

½ kg (1 1/8 lb)

clean ayocote beans, soaked in water overnight
water, as needed
½ onion, coarsely chopped
4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

FOR THE ATÁPAKUA

4

guajillo peppers, opened, seeded, roasted and soaked
3

bell peppers, opened, seeded, roasted and soaked
½ onion in quarters, roasted
2 cloves garlic, roasted and peeled
4

saladet tomatoes, roasted, peeled and seeded
2 sprigs cilantro (leaves only)
3 sprigs mint (leaves only)
1 l (1 qt) water
75 g (2 2/3 oz) tortilla dough
salt to taste
100 g (3 ½ oz) cotija cheese, grated

PROCEDURE 1 TO COOK BEANS (CLAY POT)

Drain and rinse beans. Cook them with onion, garlic and 4 l of water in a clay pot over high heat. When they reach a boil, reduce heat to low and cook until tender but firm, for 2 ½ hours. Remove from heat and set aside.

PROCEDURE 2 TO COOK BEANS (PRESSURE COOKER)

Drain and rinse beans. Cook them with onion, garlic and 1 ½ l (1 ½ qt) water in the pressure cooker, cover and cook for 45 minutes after the pot is sealed, over reduced heat. Remove from heat and set aside.

PROCEDURE FOR THE ATÁPAKUA

Grind peppers, onion, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, mint and 1 cup water.
Dilute the dough into 1 cup water and strain.
Cook the mixture of peppers in a saucepan over low heat. Add the dough and remaining water, continue cooking until the dough is cooked. Add some of the cooking liquid from the beans if necessary, to obtain a light sauce. Add the drained beans and season.
Serve hot in bowls with cheese sprinkled on top.

GLOSS

Atápakuas are traditional dishes from Michoacán’s Purépecha area. The word’s meaning comes from the native ata, which, in the context of food, means to spread, dye, nurture and sustain life; pa, denoting an action in time and space, fire, or a fiery burning object; and kua, a condition, action, situation and specific instrument. Hence atápakua is a nutritious spicy stew that sustains life. Based on historical and linguistic sources, researchers have demonstrated that atápakua’s roots go back to pre-Hispanic time, and its basic ingredients are definitely pre-Columbian corn and chiles. Another element that speaks to their remote origins is that in general the ingredients in atápakuas are not fried—frying was introduced with the arrival of Europeans to what is now Mexico.

Productos

Cascabel chile
Guajillo chile
Runner beans (Ayocote)