FISH TAMALES 20 tamales 60 g (2 1/8 oz) each

INGREDIENTS

1


package banana leaves, clean, veined, and cut into 20 x 20 cm (7 ¾ in by 7 ¾ in) squares; heat softened

FOR FISH

¾ kg (1 2/3 lb) sea bass filets
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt to taste

FOR THE FILLING

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
2

jalapeño peppers, opened, seeded, finely chopped
6 saladet tomatoes, thinly sliced
¼

cup epazote (leaves only) coarsely chopped
salt to taste

FOR THE DOUGH

400 g (1 lb) lard
salt to taste
1 kg (2 ¼ lb) corn tortilla dough (masa)
fish stock or water as needed

PROCEDURE FOR THE FISH

Coat fish fillets with olive oil and salt.
Warm a skillet over medium heat and grill the fish. Cool and crumble the meat. Set aside.

PROCEDURE FOR THE FILLING

Warm the olive oil in a deep pan over medium heat, add onion, garlic, peppers and tomatoes, sautéing until the ingredients are cooked but firm. Remove from heat, add the epazote and season. Chill.

PROCEDURE FOR THE DOUGH

Beat the lard with a teaspoon of salt to fluff. Add the dough in small portions, along with needed broth to form a smooth, homogeneous mixture. Stop beating and add the fish with a spoon; adjust seasoning.
Place a bit of dough, with some filling in its center, on each banana leaf square. Wrap the leaves like a package and place tamales in a steamer or tamalera pot. Cook for 1 hour or until the banana leaf readily detaches from the tamal.
Serve hot.

GLOSS

Tamales (from the Nahuatl Aztec language tamalli)—defined by several authors as the food’s careful wrapping method, irrespective of filling—hold a venerable place in Mexico’s food culture. Pre-Hispanic varieties survive alongside those that incorporate post-sixteenth century ingredients and even those emerging from the cutting edge of contemporary cuisine.

Products

Jalapeño chile
Tomato saladet
Snook